Supplemental Security Income For Children

Supplemental Security Income For Children

Every child has a wish list. In fact when asked, most of them have no trouble coming up with a list on the fly of what they want for Christmas, their birthday, or just a random trip to the store. But just like most adults, what a child wants and what they need are often completely different lists.  Unless, of course, they are going without many of their basic needs. At that point, the wish list and the need list may coincide.

This is often the case with children who are disabled. Their needs can be quite different from that of the average child, and sometimes the thing that they need would make a huge difference in the quality of their life, which puts it at the top of their wish list as well.  But it is no secret that medical procedures, equipment, and care are expensive, and many families cannot afford it on their own. This is where Supplemental Security Income comes into play.

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is strictly need-based.  It is a government program funded by general fund taxes, and is based on income and assets of the recipient.  Unlike Social Security Disability benefits, SSI has nothing to do with work history. For a child to be eligible to receive SSI, there are certain requirements.

AGE

In order for a child to receive SSI, you must be unmarried and under the age of 18, or under the age of 22 and regularly attend school, as defined by Social Security.  There is no minimum age requirement. You can apply for SSI as early as the child’s date of birth.

DISABILITY

In order to be eligible for SSI, a child must have a physical or mental condition that severely limits their activities. In addition, this condition must last at least one year or be a condition that leads to death.  A state agency determines disability for each case. In the state of Kentucky there are 200 conditions that automatically qualify as a disability, which means that it would meet these criteria for SSI eligibility. If your condition isn’t on this list of 200, that doesn’t mean you don’t qualify. It just means that you don’t automatically meet this criteria and a review of your condition may be necessary.

INCOME

Because this is a needs based program, SSI is for children with little to no income or resources. The parents’ income is often factored into this equation, but expenses and other factors are considered as well.  There are certain cases in which a child can still work without most, if not all, of the income not counting against your SSI. This is especially true if the child is a student.

The Denney, Morgan, Rather & Gilbert Difference

There are other factors that come into play, and many applications get denied the first time. If you have a child who is disabled, your child may be eligible for Supplemental Security Income.

At Denney, Morgan, Rather & Gilbert we can help you file for SSI from the initial application all the way through the appeals process if necessary. With the knowledge and experience that our attorneys have in disability claims, we will fight hard to get you and your family the financial help you need. In fact, we don’t get paid unless you do. To schedule a free consultation, contact us today.